Physician Burdens

The Physician Burdens engagement is now closed. Your input will be used to inform policy development at Doctors of BC. The results from this engagement have been included in a What we Heard report distributed to members.

Help us understand how we can advocate for you

We know physicians are frustrated by mounting demands. For many, the volume and pace of these demands has become burdensome, and this can have serious consequences for physicians and the health care system.

A dedicated, long-term approach that focuses on systemic change is needed. Doctors of BC is committed to advocating for this change.

A literature review and early member engagement revealed 10 key burden areas. We now need your input to understand if and how these impact you. Scroll down to the three blue tabs below to share your thoughts.

Your input will help inform policy recommendations specific to the BC context and enable Doctors of BC to advocate for solutions that reflect your experience and meet your needs.



Have your say

Take 10 to 15 minutes to share your input on this online engagement platform:

  • Go to Step 1 to help us Identify the burdens
  • Go to Step 2 to help us Understand their impacts
  • Go to Step 3 to Inform our solutions


Navigate through this online platform by clicking the three blue tabs below.

Help us understand how we can advocate for you

We know physicians are frustrated by mounting demands. For many, the volume and pace of these demands has become burdensome, and this can have serious consequences for physicians and the health care system.

A dedicated, long-term approach that focuses on systemic change is needed. Doctors of BC is committed to advocating for this change.

A literature review and early member engagement revealed 10 key burden areas. We now need your input to understand if and how these impact you. Scroll down to the three blue tabs below to share your thoughts.

Your input will help inform policy recommendations specific to the BC context and enable Doctors of BC to advocate for solutions that reflect your experience and meet your needs.



Have your say

Take 10 to 15 minutes to share your input on this online engagement platform:

  • Go to Step 1 to help us Identify the burdens
  • Go to Step 2 to help us Understand their impacts
  • Go to Step 3 to Inform our solutions


Navigate through this online platform by clicking the three blue tabs below.

Tell us what specific demands are burdening you or your practice.

Share as many specific examples as you'd like in the comment box below. Comments will be displayed below and can be viewed by other physicians.

Your input will provide further insight into if and how the burden areas identified in the literature and early member engagement impact physicians across BC.

Click the Submit button to publish your comment.

Let's get the registration process to this new platform modernized, first. Then my comments will make more sense.

Clayton Reynolds 4 months ago

interfacing with technology is a burden - takes a lot of time to review all the paperwork that comes into the EMR; working with the EMR takes you away from your patients and actually engaging with them; increasing complexity of patients - in a semi-urban setting I handle all their medical problems but there is no "complexity" billing code for specialists that do that (I am a Respirologist and manage all of their general medicine problems too; I manage 4 post lung transplant patients and several with pulmonary hypertension; and many on immunosuppressives for ILD - these patients take a lot of my time) ;

sunshine 4 months ago

First is the advancing technology: I now do 98 % of my work by videoconference. I'm part of a new demographic. That should be represented in your intro by a new option in Practice Setting. Since I work from home, the "facility or community-based" options need to be revised, too.

Clayton Reynolds 4 months ago

Removed by moderator.

User793 4 months ago

Removed by moderator.

User793 4 months ago

Retired now for one year, so these comments are based on what I was experiencing prior to my retirement. Frustration of having probably the oldest pharmacy database in the country (Pharmanet "all drugs for all people"), yet no online prescribing available. Special Authority forms that require inputting information that in theory Pharmacare already knows about through Pharmanet. Non-standard ways of referring to specialists, and informing patients of appointments. Poor availability of support from allied health professionals. Faxes, faxes, faxes (from pharmacies, nursing homes, etc)

Speaker 4 months ago

Endless modules to maintain privilegesRequirements for administrative duties in addition to patient careCollege requirements for expensive equipment and procedures just to perform simple safe proceduresObligations to use EMR’s and technology in a way that makes the doctor the unit clerk, too

Loppel 4 months ago

Pharmacist faxes, special authorities, insurance forms that ask patients to pay, tracking down forms for specific consultants and clinics. EMR labs that recirculate. The expectation to be all things to all people. Finding, training, and retaining staff. Incomplete data due to reliance on fax, paper, and non-interoperable EMRs.

EricCadesky 4 months ago

The 24 hour nature to longitudinal care can be overwhelming where you never feel free of responsibility. If you take time off, trying to prepare for that time off and trying to catch up when you return make it almost impossible to truely be away.The paperwork is overwhelming in its magnitude.With time a scarce resource the expectations of patients continue to grow.All this system transformation is an added burden to already overly busy life and practice.

MOT 4 months ago

Dealing with EMR companies including setup and transfer. Centralized intakes where things fall through the crack and no one seems to take responsibility. Rising costs of employment (e.g. MOAs). Rising property taxes and lease rates. Increasing expectations from patients and government and College to "always" be accessible. This is neither medically necessary nor sustainable. Increasing regulatory demands from the College that don't seem to be evidence based but rather (at best) some arbitrarily chosen committee of "experts". The "privileging" dictionaries seem like a make-work project that comes around again and again and I still don't understand how it improves quality of care or safety in any actual and evidence-based way. Increasing scarcity of resources for allied health support. Programs are harder and harder to get patients into. Increased mental health demands and needs from patients with relatively few resources available. Widening gap between the haves and have-nots of physicians. Disparity between GPs and specialists vs specialists to specialists vs rural to urban vs facility to community based. Changes in tax structures federally that limit the ability of the corporation to be flexible in its financing. Loss of the CMA as an effective national advocate for physician issues now that it seems more focused on technology and patient issues. Increasing demands of College in respect to "Peer assessments" that seem arbitrary, not specific to actual practices, and again seems like a make-work project that is uncompensated for the physician and reduces time I can spend seeing patients. Ongoing rejections from MSP and delays (e.g. BH) in payment for work done that takes up a lot of time to chase down. Increasing complexity to access medications for patients that are now standard of care (ie Special authority) and the frustration that is involved in having ones patients denied appropriate medications. Increasing rise of "pseudo-science" amongst other health providers and within the medical profession itself including non-standard "injection" or "infusion" treatments and the rise of "medical cannabis" without yet having evidence to support that. Support for specialists seems to be focussed in certain areas (e.g. hips and knees) at the detriment to a lot of the hard work and long waits that other specialists face. Specialist money always seems so targeted that it becomes silos for those that happen to fit into those pots of money.

drtommy 4 months ago

Rising complexity of my patients, including multi system disease, polypharmacy, and overlying chronic mental health or social issues.High overhead costs to run a basic office. Inability to afford the non-physician assistance needed to meet patient care demands, particularly around access to mental health and social worker assistance.Rising patient expectations and my inability to meet the expected level of care, particularly around wait times for specialist consult, surgery, or imaging requests.High volume of forms for medication coverage, work absence, disability, ICBC, etc, which are poorly compensated and take time away from direct patient care.

KRoss 4 months ago

-a great deal of paperwork and approvals for things -cumbersome referral system-increasing patient expectations, coupled with increasing patient numbers, on a backdrop of a hospital administration that is looking to cut costs and reduce staffing

tommclaughlin1987 4 months ago

I am a specialist who is finding it difficult to meet the seemingly endless demand for my services. My waitlist is up to a year long and patients suffer while waiting. I am not able to fully utilize other team members (non physicians) who could greatly expand my reach and help me see more patients more efficiently. As I am outside a hospital or facility I have no access to government/health authority-funded resources, staff, etc. like other specialists have access to. I also face increasing demands from my own patients, who want to access me by email, telephone, video etc. at all hours. I would like to do this, as well as provide access in these ways to family physicians, but the remuneration for this is poor or non-existent. It would also increase my waitlist as it takes me away from face-to-face work.Documentation and regulatory demands are also taking their toll. The college seems to always add, and never subtract, new requirements for assessment of patients, reviewing PharmaNet records, and documentation of clinical encounters. Coupled with EMRs that are 'not quite there' yet, this adds to my day, reduces my focus on patients, and does nothing to improve patient care.

KingdomHearts 4 months ago

I have subtly altered my practice because of increasing patient expectations (some of which are quite unrealistic). But coupled with patient expectations is my declining ability to deliver what they need because of constraints in the system. So I am left to manage patients as best I can while they wait months and months to see the appropriate specialist or subspecialist or to undergo the procedure they need.

darebin 4 months ago